Rajendra Prasad Mohapatra

Former India captain Sachin Tendulkar is widely rated as the greatest batter after Sir Don Bradman. The Master Blaster’s rise was synonymous with India’s growth story in the 1990s. He became an inspiration for millions of Indians capturing their hearts and minds like no one else in the decade. He broke several records, set new milestones and scaled unprecedented heights during a career which lasted nearly two and a half decades.

India’s batting legend, revered as the God of Cricket, celebrates his 51st birthday on Wednesday. Sachin, concluding his illustrious career with 18,426 runs in ODIs and 15,921 runs in Tests, achieved his lifelong ambition of lifting the World Cup trophy in 2011, under MS Dhoni’s captaincy. Among his remarkable feats, Sachin notched up 100 international centuries, with 51 in Tests and 49 in ODIs.

Apart from his illustrious career and brilliant records, Sachin was also a great ambassador of the gentleman’s game. As per the statisticians of the game, with no DRS available those days, the Master Blaster was wrongly given out by umpires around 39 times in his career. 

As a result, Sachin missed many centuries and India lost many matches. Still, Sachin never uttered a single word against the umpires, rather smiled and left the ground calmly. This is the reason why fans and experts consider him as the ‘Real Gentleman’ of the gentleman’s game (cricket).

The worst among the wrong decisions was given by Jamaican umpire Steve Bucknor. The former India captain was given out wrongly on many occasions by Bucknor. One of those occasions happened in Brisbane in 2003. Sachin left a ball from Jason Gillespie which struck him on his pads. Hawk-Eye showed the ball comfortably missing the top of stumps. But Sachin was adjudged leg before by Bucknor. Though Bucknor admitted his mistake later, the damage had already been inflicted.

In hindsight, several fans think that had Sachin not given out wrongly so many times in his career, he would have probably scored an incredible 150 centuries in his brilliant career.
 

scrollToTop