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Nitesh Kumar Sahoo

Health experts have warned people to exercise caution before consuming antibiotic drugs. Addressing the National Conference of Paediatric Infectious Disease (NCPID)-2021 in the State Capital Bhubaneswar, specialists shed light on the dangers of overuse of antibiotics and asked the public to adhere to protocols. 

The Indian Association of Paediatrics (IAP), Odisha, on Saturday organised the two-day conference themed 'Antibiotic Steward: Need of Hour'. 

Around 250 doctors from around the State and outside attended the conference. The aim of organising the event was to hold an open discussion over the advancements in the medical profession and to share more relevant information about different infectious diseases detected among children and their treatments. 

During the conference, medical professionals and specialists claimed that overusing and misusing antibiotics for treating simple diseases has emerged as a major concern. 

The experts highlighted that people more often tend to purchase medicines from the stores without necessary and proper advice from doctors and take antibiotics even for simple allergies or infections. Parents even do not hesitate to give antibiotic drugs to their children with hopes of effective treatment. 

And such practice for a prolonged period of time for example in a decade or two might become a serious threat because overuse of antibiotics will slowly trigger body's unresponsiveness towards drugs, a condition called 'antibiotic resistance'.

"Paediatric specialists from across the country attended the national conference meant to shed light on different contagious diseases in children. The doctors will discuss about different case studies and about the latest treatments available for the same," said Nilamadhab Jena, President of IAP Odisha.

The experts have appealed one and all to consult a doctor or certified physicians before taking any medicine instead of opting for self-medication.
 

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