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Dilip Kumar

News Highlights

  • The treatment continued in near darkness condition at the non-trauma casualty ward of the premier health institute in absence of uninterrupted power supply facility.
  • A video purportedly showing physicians attending the patients at the emergency ward of the hospital has gone viral on social media platforms.

In a highly unfortunate incident that raises serious questions on the quality of health care services in the State, doctors were seen treating critical patients with the help of torch and mobile flash lights at Cuttack SCB Medical College and Hospital for around 20 minutes due to a sudden power cut on Sunday night.

The treatment continued in near darkness condition at the non-trauma casualty ward of the premier health institute in absence of uninterrupted power supply facility.

A video purportedly showing physicians attending the patients at the emergency ward of the hospital has gone viral on social media platforms.

According to reports, electricity supply at the ward went out of order suddenly at around 9.30 pm on Sunday. The generator set which was installed on the hospital premises to provide uninterrupted power backup, didn’t serve the purpose due to technical glitches during the time of emergency.

Several patients lying on the beds, some of them on the grounds were seen attended by the doctors with torch and mobile phone lights. Treatment continued under faint lighting for around 15-20 minutes till the power connection was restored, reports said.

Authorities, however, attributed the incident to technical issues in the DG set. However, the technical officials swung into action and repaired the generator which normalised the situation later.

This is not an isolated incident as power outrages are not new to the renowned multispecialty health centre of the State.

In May this year, the Covid ward at the reputed hospital had also witnessed frequent power-cuts which put the patients at risk. Many serious patients were also on ventilators which failed to run without electricity.

In 2018, patient care was also thrown out of gear at the casualty, trauma care, paediatric and new dengue wards of the state-run hospital due to a load shedding for over five hours.

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