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Nitesh Kumar Sahoo

There would be rarely any person who doesn't like mangoes. Mango lovers get wide access to varieties of delicious and juicy tropical fruits, especially in the summer season. Prices of the mangoes vary with the type. However, have you ever heard of a mango ranging Rs 2.5 lakh per Kg!

Yes, though it is impossible to believe, a farmer from Odisha's Bargarh has grown a special breed of mangoes that costs Rs 2.5 lakh per Kg.  

Chandra Satyanarayan, a farmer hailing from Nilathara village under Paikamala block of Bargarh district, has been growing different breeds of mangoes on his farmland. The types include Miyazaki mango originally of Japanese breed and Icebox variety mangoes which can be stored in the cold storage for three years.

The market price of Miyazaki mango is 3 lakh and this breed is rich in vitamin, beta carotene and folic acid. 

Three years back Satyanarayan learnt about this mango breed from his friend and planted saplings of the mango breed after importing it from Bangladesh.

While Satyanarayan's farm has been turning the heads of many, his turnovers from the cultivation has streamed inspiration among many farmers.

"People from different places across the state are visiting our farm. We had imported the sapling from Bangladesh. Initially, after planting the sapling, we considered the produce on an experimental basis, such as whether it suits the climatic condition or not and if the product is affected or not. This year we have yielded the second time and the produce was satisfactory," said Sai Bhaskar, son of Satyanarayan.
 
Further, Sai added, "However, we are facing challenges in marketing and selling the produce."

"Satyanarayan had imported saplings of Miyazaki mango breed from Bangladesh. Though he hasn't initiated efforts for commercial purposes, the saplings he had brought have started bearing fruits. After 15 to 20 days, the fruits will get matured and by observing the colour indexing we can learn about its actual colour," said Soumya Ranjan Patnaik, Assistant Horticulture Officer.

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